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The Las Piñas Bamboo Organ: A Natural Treasure Edit

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Explora Team  • Contributor
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The oldest known bamboo organ in the world can be found in the Philippines. Let us feature this distinct and historic instrument ever existed.

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The Bamboo Organ is the largest pipe organ in the world today, with a unique sound compared with other pipe organs. It consists of 1031 pipes, which 902 are bamboos and the rest are made of metal. 


The organ hangs vertically off the wall of the St. Joseph Parish Church in Las Pinas City, reminiscent of the classical Spanish-style. At the top of the organ is a crown that symbolizes the monarchy of Spain. Bellows, which today are electronic and motorized, supply the wind of the organ. The organ is very sensitive that it has never been cleaned since it was made.

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The Saint Joseph Parish Church, which housed the Bamboo Organ, is of a Baroque architectural style common in the 18th century. 


To see the organ up close, there is an entrance located on the right side of the church where a gift shop and other historical remains can be found. The church’s ceiling in itself is also made of preserved bamboos, while the other parts of the church were either made of stone or hardwood.  

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The Bamboo Organ was built for a total of 8 years from 1816 to 1824, by Father Diego Cera, a parish priest of Las Pinas in the 18th century.  Back then, bamboos were in abundance in Las Pinas so, the priest thought of creating an organ made of such. 

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In order to preserve the bamboos, they were buried in the ground for one year to remove the starch and sugar which could cause their decay.


In the past, two to six people were needed in order to pump the organ.

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Interested to see more unique and one-of-a-kind artifacts?  Join our heritage tours!

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Book our Manila Heritage Tour here

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Book our Intramuros Walking Tour here.


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